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  1. July 19, 2016
    Eisenhower Farm to Table Dinner Celebrating National Park Service’s 100th Anniversary

    To buy tickets, click here to go to the ticket page and choose August 27 on the calendar

    CONTACT:

    Cindy Small, Chief Marketing Officer 717-339-2109; csmall@gettysburgfoundation.org

    Eisenhower Farm to Table Dinner Celebrating National Park Service’s 100th Anniversary

    Gettysburg, PA (July 19, 2016) – On August 27, Eisenhower National Historic Site will host an exclusive farm to table dinner at the historic Eisenhower National Historic Site to celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the National Park Service. The event is a collaboration of the Gettysburg Foundation, Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site. The dinner is curated by Chef Ben Walmer and Highlands Dinner Club, a mobile, culinary and social laboratory, in which participants join forces to design events and menus relevant to locations and occasions.

    The five-course dinner will be served under a tent on the historic grounds from 5:30 to 10:30 p.m. A team of accomplished chefs will work with provisions from local farms, gardens, orchards, wineries, micro-breweries, distilleries, and more, to create a unique meal that will reach deep into the historical roots of the 34th president of the United States. Gettysburg Story film creator Jake Boritt will produce a series of short films to chronicle the creation of this singular meal to premiere that evening. Boritt was raised on a Civil War farm in Gettysburg that served as a stop on the Underground Railroad and a Confederate Hospital during the battle.

    Tickets for this very special event are $125 and include: a five-course meal; cocktails; and a tour of the President’s home and gardens nestled within view of the South Mountain Range. Experience dancing to the Dave Winter Group at sunset. Parking for the event is available at the farm. Tickets can be purchased online (choose August 27 on the calendar) or at the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum and Visitor Center. Guests may pick up purchased tickets at the Visitor Center’s “Will Call” window by Friday, August 26 or at the event. The dinner will be held rain or shine.

    The Gettysburg Foundation

    The Gettysburg Foundation is a non-profit educational organization working in partnership with the National Park Service to enhance preservation and understanding of the heritage and lasting significance of Gettysburg. The Foundation raised funds for and now operates the Museum and Visitor Center at Gettysburg National Military Park, which opened in April 2008. In addition to operating the Museum and Visitor Center, the Foundation has a broad preservation mission that includes land, monument and artifact preservation and battlefield rehabilitation—all in support of the National Park Service’s goals at Gettysburg.

    The Eisenhower National Historic Site

    Eisenhower National Historic Site preserves and interprets the home and farms of the Eisenhower family as a fitting and enduring memorial to the life, work, and times of General Dwight David Eisenhower, 34th president of the United States, and to the events of far-reaching importance that occurred on the property. The Eisenhower National Historic Site is open daily with shuttle buses leaving the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum and Visitor Center every 30 minutes. Advance reservations are available and highly recommended for groups. Reservations can be made by calling 877-874-2478.

    categories: Press Releases
  2. July 8, 2016
    Cemetery Ridge Project - NPS Announce Detours, Temporary Parking and Cemetery Access

     

     

     

    CLICK HERE FOR A MAP OF THE AFFECTED AREA

         

    For Release: 7/6/16
    Contact: Katie Lawhon
    Office: 717/ 338-4402
    Katie_Lawhon@nps.gov

    The rehab of Cemetery Ridge will begin July 11 - NPS announces detours, temporary parking and cemetery access

    The parking area and sidewalks for the Soldiers’ National Cemetery at Gettysburg National Military Park along Taneytown Road will close on July 11 for up to six months for a construction project, National Park Service officials have announced. To accommodate national cemetery visitors during the project, a number of detours and temporary access points have been established.

    Parking - Temporary grass and gravel parking lots for the National Cemetery will be designated on the east side of Taneytown Road, across from the existing lot, and at the intersection of Taneytown Road and Hunt Avenue.

    Pedestrian Access - Because of sidewalk closures on the west side of Taneytown Road, pedestrian access to the national cemetery will be through a new gate through the stone wall on the south side of the cemetery, directly accessible from the temporary parking area. All existing cemetery gates will remain open during cemetery hours. Pedestrians using the trail from the park Museum and Visitor Center will be rerouted onto a new temporary grass trail on the east side of Taneytown Road.

    Handicapped accessibility - Visitors with mobility impairments may obtain special permission from Park Rangers in the Museum and Visitor Center to drive into the Soldiers’ National Cemetery.

    Auto Tour Route - Cars following the Gettysburg National Military Park’s auto tour route will be directed from Hancock Avenue to Steinwehr Avenue to Taneytown Road to the temporary parking lot for the cemetery (Auto Tour stop 16). Buses, RVs and large vehicles will follow detour signs on a special route via Steinwehr Avenue to Queen Street, to Fairview Avenue, to Gettys Street, to Washington Street, to Taneytown Road to the Hunt Avenue temporary parking area. These large vehicles must take special care when parking at Hunt Avenue due to wet areas on the left and right side of the entrance.

    Local traffic detour - Local traffic that uses this area for access between Taneytown Road and Steinwehr Avenue will be redirected to the intersection of Taneytown Road and Steinwehr Avenue or Wheatfield Road.

    Freedom transit – The Gold Line shuttle’s cemetery stop will be relocated to the temporary parking lot.

    Bicycle traffic – Bicyclists, including users of the Gettysburg Inner Loop bike trail, will stay on Steinwehr Avenue to the intersection with Taneytown Road and proceed to the bike racks inside the Taneytown Road entrance to the cemetery.

    Project background – This $1.5 million dollar project will rehabilitate Cemetery Ridge at Gettysburg National Military Park, bringing back missing features on the historic landscape at the center of the Union Army’s battle line and reduce the size of a parking area at Ziegler’s Grove. The nonprofit Gettysburg Foundation provided a grant of $900,000 to match National Park Service funding of $600,000. Special funding from the National Park Service was made available as a National Park Service Centennial initiative.

    Details about the project are available on “From the Fields of Gettysburg,” the official blog of Gettysburg National Military Park, at https://npsgnmp.wordpress.com/2015/05/21/gettysburg-details-rehabbing-cemetery-ridge/.

    categories: Press Releases
  3. June 29, 2016
    A New Civil War Art Exhibit at Gettysburg National Military Park Museum & Visitor Center

    A New Civil War Art Exhibit Opens Wednesday, June 29 at Gettysburg National Military Park Museum & Visitor Center


    The Gettysburg Foundation and Gettysburg National Military Park are pleased to announce the opening of an exciting new exhibit June 29 dedicated to artworks focusing on Gettysburg and the American Civil War.

    Titled With Brush, Mold, Chisel, and Pen: Reflections on Civil War Art, the exhibit features some of the most celebrated artists of the 19th and early 20th centuries – including several who served in the war. It showcases artworks in oil, pen-and-ink and sculpture that capture battles and the experiences of leaders and common soldiers. These objects – many related to Gettysburg – evoke facets of a portrait of the United States during one of its most turbulent eras.

    The exhibit debuts in the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum & Visitor Center’s Gilder Lehrman Special Exhibits Gallery and its artworks hail from the collection of Gettysburg National Military Park, as well as several on loan from the Civil War Museum of Philadelphia and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History Collection.
    Admission to With Brush, Mold, Chisel, and Pen: Reflections on Civil War Art is included with the purchase of Cyclorama, Film and Museum Experience tickets or with purchase of museum-only tickets, all available at the ticket counter in the lobby of the Museum & Visitor Center, online at www.gettysburgfoundation.org, or by telephone at 877-874-2478.

    Highlights include:
    “Opening of the Battle of Gettysburg and Death of General Reynolds, July 1, 1863” by Xanthus Russell Smith (1839-1929). Smith briefly served in the Union Navy during the Civil War. He also painted one of the earliest depictions of the death of Major General John F. Reynolds during the Battle of Gettysburg. Commander of the Union Army’s First Corps, Reynolds was the highest ranking officer in either army killed at Gettysburg. The painting shows Union and Confederate forces rushing into battle and combines many of the classic elements typical of 19th century landscape paintings. Smith came from a prominent family of American artists. The Foundation acquired this painting and donated it to the Park in 2015.

    Full-length oil portrait of Major General George G. Meade by Thomas Hicks (1823-1890). A renowned 19th century portrait painter, Hicks completed this large-scale portrait of George Gordon Meade, commander of the Union’s Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg and throughout the end of the war, in 1876. The painting incorporates many characteristics of grand-format European portraits. Hicks started his art studies at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia and continued them in New York, London, Paris, Florence and Rome – experiencing many of the classical portrait styles that came to exemplify his work.

    Bronze bust of Confederate General Robert E. Lee by Moses Jacob Ezekiel (1844-1917). The sculpture is one Confederate soldier’s tribute to his former commander. The first Jewish student to attend Virginia Military Institute (VMI), Ezekiel was wounded in the renowned charge of the VMI cadets at the Battle of New Market on May 15, 1864. After the war, he returned to VMI, graduating in 1866. The prominent American sculptor studied in Berlin and lived and worked the majority of his life in Rome. Ezekiel won a number of competitions and completed significant commissioned sculptures in Europe and America.

    Bronze statue of Admiral George Melville by Samuel A. Murray (1869-1941). Visitors to the Gettysburg battlefield can view this sculptor’s lasting contributions – Goddess of Victory and Peace atop the largest monument, the Pennsylvania State Memorial, and the portrait statue of Father William Corby, chaplain of the famed Irish Brigade’s 88th New York Infantry and later president of Notre Dame University. A protégé of the renowned artist Thomas Eakins, the Philadelphian had a career spanning a half century, including commissions for sculptures and building design elements throughout Pennsylvania. Murray’s connections to prominent Philadelphia Civil War veterans – such as the subject of this bust – defined several of his works.

    “Confederate Soldier Types,” Pen and ink sketch no. 27 by Allen C. Redwood (1844-1922). Virginia-born Redwood served in the Confederate Army. In his post-war career, Redwood became a prolific illustrator for several publications, including Century and Harper’s magazines, both of which brought the first illustrated histories of the Civil War to the post-war American public. One of the most popular illustrations of the period – and the original submitted to Century Magazine by the artist – this work reflects the determination of the Civil War soldier. Redwood later illustrated the events of the Spanish-American War for Harper’s Magazine

    “Battlefield Headquarters, Antietam,” Pen and ink sketch no. 31 by Rufus F. Zogbaum (1849-1925). This works of this artist, born in Charleston, South Carolina, were so well known that Rudyard Kipling once referred to him in one of his poems. Zogbaum studied at the Art Students League in New York City and under Léon Bonnat in Paris; he also influenced the work of younger artists who later attained fame, such as Frederic Remington. In a time when popular magazines often hired freelance artists, Zogbaum served on Century Magazine’s staff, often as a de-facto illustration editor. He was known for his skill at conveying the power of a moment, well demonstrated by this illustration, an original he submitted to Century Magazine.

    Carved walnut cane made from a limb of a tree at Devil's Den, Gettysburg Battlefield. A popular folk-art form of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, battlefield wood souvenir canes provided a tangible link to hallowed ground for veterans and post-war visitors alike. Visitors enjoyed them as mementos of their pilgrimage to the battlefield. Often fashioned from trees at a battlefield location with special significance or featuring carvings based on familiar military symbols or themes, the canes provided Civil War veterans with connections to their wartime experiences.

    Wooden drum-style canteen. This early 19th century military “cheesebox” canteen may have been carried or painted by a Confederate soldier – they were common among Southern forces – to pass the time or reminisce about wartime service. The canteen is an example of how soldiers expressed themselves through creative illustration on or customization of military equipment.

    Admission to With Brush, Mold, Chisel, and Pen: Reflections on Civil War Art is included with the purchase of Cyclorama, Film and Museum Experience tickets or with purchase of museum-only tickets, all available at the ticket counter in the lobby of the Museum & Visitor Center, online at www.gettysburgfoundation.org, or by telephone at 877-874-2478.

    The Gettysburg Foundation is a non-profit educational organization working in partnership with the National Park Service to enhance preservation and understanding of the heritage and lasting significance of Gettysburg. The Foundation raised funds for and now operates the Museum and Visitor Center at Gettysburg National Military Park, which opened in April 2008. In addition to operating the Museum and Visitor Center, the Foundation has a broad preservation mission that includes land, monument and artifact preservation and battlefield rehabilitation—all in support of the National Park Service’s goals at Gettysburg.

    ###

    categories: Press Releases
  4. May 4, 2016
    Civil War Museum of Philadelphia Announces Historic Agreement to Showcase World Class Collection at Gettysburg and NCC

    For Additional Information:
    Suzanne M. Tavani
    For the Civil War Museum of Philadelphia
    Suzanne.tavani@verizon.net
    215-901-8132

    Cindy Small
    Gettysburg Foundation
    csmall@gettysburgfoundation.com
    717-339-2109

    CIVIL WAR MUSEUM OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES HISTORIC AGREEMENT TO SHOWCASE WORLD CLASS COLLECTION

    Agreement with the Gettysburg Foundation and the National Constitution Center Will Provide Future Generations With Access To World Class Collection

    PHILADELPHIA – May 4, 2016 – The Civil War Museum of Philadelphia Board of Governors and the Gettysburg Foundation today announced an historic partnership to ensure that the largest collection of Civil War artifacts, not under government stewardship, will be cared for at the highest possible standards, will be maintained in perpetuity, and will be exhibited in venues where millions of visitors will have expanded access to it.

    The Gettysburg Foundation, the Gettysburg National Military Park, and the Civil War Museum have worked together to care for the artifacts since 2010. In seeking a strategy to protect the collection for the long-term, the Museum Board recognized that Gettysburg was the ideal partner for CWMP in its efforts to preserve this historic collection.

    “There is no more iconic and authentic place for learning about the Civil War,” said Oliver St. Clair Franklin, chair of the Museum Board. “Millions of people visit each year from across the country and across the world. The staff at Gettysburg knows better than anyone else how to care for and preserve these artifacts.&rdquo

    Since 2010, the Gettysburg Foundation and Gettysburg National Military Park have not only cared for the collection, but has also exhibited artifacts in the galleries of the Museum and Visitors Center and in special exhibits, such as the one commemorating the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War, “Treasures of the Civil War”.

    “The Civil War Museum collection complements our own holdings in important ways,” said Robert A. Kinsley, chairman of the board, the Gettysburg Foundation. “These artifacts are intimately connected to specific individuals and their roles in the war. These objects, used by those whose service shaped this conflict, will enhance our ability to connect visitors to the story of the Civil War on a personal and emotional, as well as an intellectual level. All the artifacts in the collection are significant to the history of our nation. In particular, the General George Meade Collection evokes stories and imagery of his leadership at Gettysburg during the battle that changed the course of history. When you see the American flag that was flown over Meade’s headquarters at Gettysburg, or see the bullet hole in his campaign hat, you can feel the passion, the courage and the conviction of the men who bravely fought to preserve our nation.”

    Ed Clark, Superintendent of the Gettysburg National Military Park, added, “These amazing objects will enable us to better tell the story of the Battle of Gettysburg and the American Civil War. They will inspire our visitors now and for generations to come.”

    The Board of the Civil War Museum approached Gettysburg after it evaluated its prospects for building a new museum for the collection in Philadelphia and it became clear that it would be both a challenge to build it and an even bigger challenge to sustain it over time. “As stewards of this world class collection, the Board of the Civil War Museum felt a strong ethical and historical responsibility to developing a partnerships that would both protect this collection and ensure that it is accessible to the public and researchers in both Gettysburg and Philadelphia into the future, said Franklin”

    The National Constitution Center will play an important role in this partnership, as well. While the Civil War Museum will transfer ownership of the artifact collection to the Gettysburg Foundation, Gettysburg has agreed to loan the National Constitution Center artifacts from the collection. If funding is secured, the Center will create the first permanent exhibit in America dedicated to the constitutional legacy of the Civil War and the passage of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments. This will keep a significant part of the collection in Philadelphia, expand the number of people who can will see it, and enhance the National Constitution Center’s role as America’s only museum of the U.S. Constitution.

    “We are thrilled about the possibility that the National Constitution Center will create America’s first and only exhibit about the constitutional legacy of the Civil War,” said Jeffrey Rosen, President & CEO of the National Constitution Center. “The creation of a Civil War exhibit would help us tell the story of how Thomas Jefferson’s promise in the Declaration of Independence, that all men are created equal, wasn’t vindicated until Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and the passage of the Reconstruction Amendments.”

    The agreement does not include the archives and books of the Civil War Museum. This important two-dimensional material, which will remain the property of the Museum is subject to a separate long-term stewardship agreement, is housed at the Heritage Center of the Union League of Philadelphia where researchers and others can access it.

    About the Civil War Museum of Philadelphia

    The Civil War Museum of Philadelphia, the oldest Civil War museum in the country, was chartered in 1888 by the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States as the War Library and Museum. The museum’s artifact collection is one of the most historically significant and largest in the country outside of government hands with more than 3,000 items.

    About the Gettysburg Foundation and Gettysburg National Military Park

    The Gettysburg Foundation is a non-profit educational organization working in partnership with the National Park Service to enhance preservation and understanding of the heritage and lasting significance of Gettysburg. The Foundation raised funds for and now operates the Museum and Visitor Center at Gettysburg National Military Park, which opened in April 2008. In addition to operating the Museum and Visitor Center, the Foundation has a broad preservation mission that includes land, monument and artifact preservation and battlefield rehabilitation—all in support of the National Park Service’s goals at Gettysburg.

    Gettysburg National Military Park preserves, protects, and interprets for this and future generations the resources associated with the 1863 Battle of Gettysburg during the American Civil War, the Soldiers’ National Cemetery, and their commemorations. The Eisenhower National Historic Site preserves and interprets the home and farms of the Eisenhower family as a fitting and enduring memorial to the life, work, and times of General Dwight David Eisenhower, 34th president of the United States, and to the events of far-reaching importance that occurred on the property. www.nps.gov/eise

    About the National Constitution Center

    The National Constitution Center in Philadelphia inspires active citizenship as the only place where people across America and around the world can come together to learn about, debate, and celebrate the greatest vision of human freedom in history, the U.S. Constitution. A private, nonprofit organization, the Center serves as America’s leading platform for constitutional education and debate, fulfilling its Congressional charter “to disseminate information about the U.S. Constitution on a non-partisan basis.”

    As the Museum of We the People, the Center brings the Constitution to life for visitors of all ages through interactive programs and exhibits. As America’s Town Hall, the Center brings the leading conservative and liberal thought leaders together to debate the Constitution on all media platforms. As a center for Civic Education, the Center delivers the best educational programs and online resources that inspire, excite, and engage citizens about the U.S. Constitution. For more information, call 215-409-6700 or visit www.constitutioncenter.org

    History of the Civil War Museum of Philadelphia

    The Civil War Museum of Philadelphia, the oldest Civil War museum in the country, was chartered in 1888, but its collection was begun in 1865 by the members of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (M.O.L.L.U.S./Loyal Legion). When the body of President Lincoln lay in state in Independence Hall in April 1865, it was a group of Philadelphia’s veteran Federal Army and Navy officers who served as the honor guard. Afterward, these men decided to establish an organization, M.O.L.L.U.S., to commemorate the sacrifices and the meaning the war.

    The collection was begun soon after the end of the War when MOLLUS members began to donate important personal belongings and other items to preserve them and to create a place where the story of the war could be told. In the 1880’s, the era of commemorations began in earnest with the building of memorials and the work to preserve battlefield’s like Gettysburg. M.O.L.L.U.S. provided leadership for these efforts, as well, with Col. John Nicholson, a M.O.L.L.U.S. founder, the chair of the Gettysburg commission. In 1888, in recognition of the scale and significance of the collection, M.O.L.L.U.S. chartered the museum and library as a separate organization, the War Library and Museum.

    The Museum had a series of temporary homes and, from 1922 until its closing in 2008, was housed in a townhouse at 18th and Pine Streets. It closed in anticipation of moving to a new museum facility. With the assistance of the experts at the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts in Philadelphia, a plan was created for the preparation, preservation and move of the collection to Gettysburg. The William Penn Foundation and the Exelon Foundation provided major funding to support the implementation of the plan. The Museum also received a prestigious “Save America’s Treasures” grant, a collaborative program of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Park Service, and the Institute for Museum and Library Services, designed to support conservation of the most important collections in the country. This allowed conservation work to be done to major components of the collection.

    The artifact collection of the Civil War Museum of Philadelphia’s (CWMP) is one of the most historically significant and largest in the country outside of government hands with more than 3000 items. The museum was chartered as the War Library and Museum in 1888 by its founders, the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (M.O.L.L.U.S. or the Loyal Legion)

    Harold Holzer, a noted Civil War historian and Co-Chair of the United States Lincoln Bicentennial Commission, pointed out the collection’s singular importance:

     “The Civil War Museum's collection is unique in that it is the product of the personal records, possessions and memories of the Union officers who founded the institution in the 19th century.  It is rare to have such important documents, artifacts, and cultural materials from so many individuals together in a single collection that tells the complex story of an era, especially one as important to our history as the Civil War.  This is truly an American treasure that needs and deserves the investment of funds and expertise to preserve it.”

    Notable items in the collection

    Civil War leaders such as Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock, Gen. William Sherman, and Gen. George Gordon Meade are represented in the collection.

    • Tiffany sword presented to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant by his officers to commemorate the victory at Vicksburg and the gold and ivory pen used by Abraham Lincoln to sign the Lieutenant General's commission of Ulysses S. Grant.
    • Fragments of the flag raised by Abraham Lincoln at Independence Hall, Feb. 22, 1861.
    • Smoking jacket captured from Confederate President Jefferson Davis’s luggage as he fled Richmond
    • Pike from the supply that John Brown brought to Harpers Ferry
    • Sash and sword belt of Gen. John Reynolds killed on the first day of the battle of Gettysburg after stopping the Confederate advance
    • Uniform frock coat and officer's slouch hat with bullet hole worn by Major General George G. Meade at the Battle of Gettysburg.
    • Brass and wood baton presented to Gen. William T. Sherman by President Andrew Johnson and carried during the Grand Review in Washington, D.C., in 1865.
    • Original wanted poster for Booth and his accomplices. Images of Surrat, Booth, and Harold at top.

    Other Items

    • Firearms, edged weapons, and ammunition
    • Uniforms, field equipment and utensils
    • Recruiting posters and broadsides
    • Badges and insignia
    • Escutcheons (military coats of arms)
    • Surgical tools and medicines
    • Band instruments
    • “Souvenirs” from battlefields, hospitals and prisoner of war camps which provide a powerful connection to the fighting men who owned them and to their service.

    Flags

    Frederick P. Todd, in his foundational work entitled American Military Equipage, rated the Museum’s collection of flags as one of the top three repositories of flags of importance in the United States, second only to the collections at the United States Military Academy at West Point and the Chicago Historical Society.

    • Gen. George Custer’s personal battle flag, from the battle at Gettysburg
    • Fragments of the U.S. flag raised at Independence Hall by the newly elected  President Abraham Lincoln, whose speech on that day declared that he’d rather be assassinated than surrender the Union to the forces trying to pull it apart
    • A remnant of the Confederate flag captured at Darien, Georgia in one of the war's first engagements by an armed Federal African-American unit
    • The flags of the famed Confederate gunboat and blockade runner, the CSS Florida, captured by the future Adm. George Melville in Bahia Brazil
    • Various battle and regimental flags

    Paintings

    • David Bustill Bowser’s moving portrait of Lincoln, part of a series of four portraits of the President painted by this distinguished African American artist trained in Philadelphia at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts
    • Thomas Hicks full-length portrait of Gen. George Gordon Meade, with its background the battlefield at Gettysburg and Meade wearing the frock coat that is in the collection
    • William Spang’s evocative painting, “The Armed Slave”, whose iconography demonstrates the message of change for enslaved Africans through the musket propped behind the subject’s chair and the book he holds providing evidence that he has the right and the leisure time to develop literacy.

    Items from the Confederacy

    The Confederacy is represented in the collection by “spoils of war”:

    • Scarf of Confederate Colonel John Singleton Mosby of the famous 'Mosby's Rangers.' He harassed both Grant's and Sherman's forces, as well as the Union Army at Gettysburg. Late in 1864, in desperate flight from the 2nd Massachusetts cavalry, in northern Virginia, the scarf blew off and landed on a roadside bush. Captain John M. Locke, in hot pursuit and at full speed, drew his saber and 'hooked it' with the blade as he passed by."
    • A remnant of the Confederate flag captured at Darien, Georgia
    • Flags of the captured CSS Florida
    • Smoking jacket captured in the luggage of Confederate president, Jefferson Davis, during his attempt to escape Union troops as they entered Richmond and described in mocking editorial cartoons of the day as his wife’s bathrobe, allegedly worn in an effort to evade capture.

    Two-Dimensional Collection

    The Civil War Museum of Philadelphia will retain a significant two-dimensional collection that it has placed at the Heritage Center at the Union League under a long-term stewardship agreement.

    The collection includes rare books and nearly 100 linear feet of photographs, maps, letters, diaries, muster rolls, scrapbooks, and other archival materials. These include:

    • The Muster Roll of Company G, 2nd  Regiment of Berdan's United States Sharp Shooters, a regiment renowned among military historians for the skill of its marksmen
    • A hand-drawn map of the Battle of Oysters Point, which is the only known representation of the disposition of troops at one of the pivotal engagements of the Gettysburg campaign
    • Illustrated letters by Union soldier Carlton Birch, with his hand-drawn images of his war experiences
    • Four hand-written orders to and from Gen. Joseph Hooker during the Battle of Chancellorsville
    • Scrapbooks of Captain Francis A. Donaldson, a Philadelphia native who became a Captain in the 118th Pennsylvania Infantry.  A prolific writer with a keen eye and acid pen, Donaldson wrote some of the most honest and perceptive letters about the war experience.  Writing to his family in Philadelphia, and to his brother who fought for the Confederacy, Donaldson is a rare open window to the personalities and politics of a regiment in the field.  These letters, as well as newspaper clippings, photographs, and post-war ephemera were preserved by Donaldson in his scrapbooks. 
    categories: Press Releases
  5. April 13, 2016
    New “Civil War Medal of Honor Recipients” Exhibit Now Open

    NEWS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    CONTACT:
    Cindy Small, Marketing and Communications Director
    717-339-2109; csmall@gettysburgfoundation.org


    New “Civil War Medal of Honor Recipients” Exhibit Opens April 15
    at Gettysburg National Military Park Museum & Visitor Center


    Gettysburg, PA (April 14, 2016) – The Gettysburg Foundation and Gettysburg National Military Park are excited to announce a new museum gallery exhibit that opens to the public on April 15 entitled, “Above and Beyond the Call of Duty: Civil War Medals of Honor in the Gettysburg Collection.” The new exhibit runs through October 1, 2016 and is the newest display of artifacts within the Exhibit Spotlight area of the Museum and Visitor Center.

    The exhibit will feature Medals of Honor and artifacts associated with Alonzo Cushing, Edward Gilligan, Daniel Riegle, James Purman and Wallace Johnson. Lt. Alonzo Cushing, was the Union Army artillery officer who valiantly died defending his position July 3, 1863, at Cemetery Ridge during Pickett’s Charge. Artifacts on display include Cushing’s Medal of Honor recently presented by President Obama, the Medal of Honor flag, the sword belt he was wearing at the time of his death and two original Cushing letters. The exhibit displays the Medals of Honor and artifacts from Edward Gilligan, Wallace Johnson, James Purman and Daniel Riegle and describes the acts of valor for which they received the medals.

    The Exhibit Spotlight gallery features a new theme and rotation of artifacts that connect soldiers, civilians and generals from the Battle of Gettysburg with artifacts and the Gettysburg battlefield. Visitors have the opportunity to follow the journey of the person featured in the exhibit through their Gettysburg experience—watching the story enfold as they explore the connections found in both the Museum galleries and on the battlefield. The exhibit is free and open to the public. It is located outside the Museum Book Store, facing the Theater Lobby area.

    The Gettysburg Foundation is a private, non-profit educational organization working in partnership with the National Park Service to enhance preservation and understanding of the heritage and lasting significance of Gettysburg. The Foundation raised funds for and now operates the Museum and Visitor Center at Gettysburg National Military Park, which opened in April 2008. In addition to operating the Museum and Visitor Center, the Foundation has a broad preservation mission that includes land, monument and artifact preservation and battlefield rehabilitation—all in support of the National Park Service’s goals at Gettysburg.
     

    categories: Press Releases
  6. January 29, 2016
    Gettysburg Foundation Accepts Monumental Artifact Donation From Civil War Collector Craig Bashein Read More

    categories: Press Releases
  7. December 2, 2015
    Gettysburg Foundation Donates Plum Run Property to National Park Service

    Joanne M. Hanley, President of the Gettysburg Foundation, presents Gettysburg National Military Park Superintendent Ed W. Clark with the deed to 45 acres of property just south of Big Round Top. The property was generously donated to the Gettysburg Foundation by Wayne and Susan Hill in 2008 and was added to the Gettysburg National Military Park boundary in December of 2014.

    Joanne M. Hanley, Gettysburg Foundation President, states, “Literally an act of Congress was required to include this property in the Gettysburg National Military Park boundary. This property was long fought for in 1863 and hard won again in 2015 when the legislation was passed to include the property in the boundary. We commemorate and celebrate this deed with thanks to the efforts of Congressman Scott Perry and Senators Bob Casey and Pat Toomey, Wayne and Sue Hill, our tireless National Park Service Partner and our Foundation Board of Directors. We present it to our NPS Partner so that they can forever steward it and keep it safe.”

    Gettysburg National Military Park Superintendent Ed Clark said, “This land’s historic significance is that cavalry skirmishes occurred near this site. Also, it is home to critical wetlands and wildlife habitat related to Plum Run. The acquisition of this property leaves a legacy for future generations by ensuring the resources of the park are protected and preserved. ”

    The Gettysburg Foundation has a broad preservation mission that includes land, monument and artifact preservation and battlefield rehabilitation, all in support of the National Park Service’s goals at Gettysburg. Information is available at www.gettysburgfoundation.org.

    Gettysburg National Military Park is a unit of the National Park Service that preserves and protects the resources associated with the Battle of Gettysburg and the Soldiers' National Cemetery, and provides an understanding of the events that occurred there within the context of American History. Information is available at www.nps.gov/gett.

    categories: Press Releases
  8. April 30, 2015
    Gettysburg Receives NPS Centennial Funding for Cemetery Ridge

    GETTYSBURG NATIONAL MILITARY PARK
    GETTYSBURG FOUNDATION

    CONTACT:
    Katie Lawhon, Management Assistant
    Gettysburg National Military Park/ Eisenhower National Historic Site
    717-338-4402; Katie_Lawhon@nps.gov


    Cindy Small, Marketing, Communications & Visitor Services Director
    Gettysburg Foundation
    717-339-2109; csmall@gettysburgfoundation.org


    Gettysburg Receives NPS Centennial Funding for Cemetery Ridge


    Gettysburg, PA (April 23, 2015) – National Park Service funding for Centennial projects will provide matching funds for a $1.3 million dollar project to rehabilitate Cemetery Ridge at Gettysburg National Military Park. The project will bring back missing features on the historic landscape at the center of the Union Army’s battle line and reduce the size of a parking area at Ziegler’s Grove. The nonprofit Gettysburg Foundation will provide a grant of $700,000 to match National Park Service funding of $600,000 for this stewardship project

    Historic features on Cemetery Ridge will be returned including: Ziegler’s ravine; commemorative walkways; and a portion of historic Hancock Avenue, as well as its ornamental entrance gates at Taneytown Road. The project will also return monuments to their original location before Cyclorama building development, and retain a portion of the parking lot for visitors to the nearby Soldiers' National Cemetery.

    “For the first time in more than fifty years, this portion of Cemetery Ridge will have its historic appearance, offering fresh experiences for a new generation of Gettysburg visitors,” said Ed Clark, Gettysburg National Military Park Superintendent. “We're excited that this important project has been embraced as a National Park Service Centennial initiative – raising it to a higher level of awareness and visibility.”

    For six years, the Gettysburg Foundation has funded and implemented important earlier phases of the rehabilitation of Cemetery Ridge including demolition of the Visitor Center in 2009; demolition of the Cyclorama building in 2013; and removal and rehabilitation of the former Visitor Center parking lot site in 2014.

    Gettysburg Foundation President Joanne M. Hanley said, “The Gettysburg Foundation has contributed to the rehabilitation of Cemetery Ridge since the inception of the idea to bring back missing features of the battlefield landscapes. It is our intent to concentrate on the work that needs to be done to see this through to the end. We are pleased, grateful and excited for this important project to be a National Park Service Centennial initiative.”

    NPS CENTENNIAL - To prepare for its Centennial in 2016, the National Park Service is funding legacy projects that will preserve resources for the future. Last month, the National Park Service launched “Find Your Park,” a national public awareness and education campaign celebrating the milestone centennial anniversary of the National Park Service in 2016 and setting the stage for its second century of service. Learn more at findyourpark.com

    Gettysburg National Military Park preserves and protects the resources associated with the Battle of Gettysburg and the Soldiers' National Cemetery and provides an understanding of the events that occurred there within the context of American history. More information is available at www.nps.gov/gett.

    Eisenhower National Historic Site preserves and protects the resources associated with the presidential home and farm in order to promote understanding and appreciation of the life, work and times of Dwight David Eisenhower. For more information go to www.nps.gov/eise.

    The Gettysburg Foundation is a non-profit educational organization working in partnership with the National Park Service to enhance preservation and understanding of the heritage and lasting significance of Gettysburg. The Foundation raised funds for and now operates the Museum and Visitor Center at Gettysburg National Military Park, which opened in April 2008. In addition to operating the Museum and Visitor Center, the Foundation has a broad preservation mission that includes land, monument and artifact preservation and battlefield rehabilitation—all in support of the National Park Service’s goals at Gettysburg.
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    categories: Press Releases